Cursive script – lowercase script

Cursive script is a style of longhand penmanship where letters are joined in a flowing manner, this is generally to make writing faster. This style of script is noticeable from the block letter style where the letters of a word are separated as in the Roman, or Gothic style scripts. Other forms of cursive script are the Spencerian script and the Copperplate script which is most commonly associated with the English Roundhand script.

Note: Where the formal cursive script letters used in a word are generally joined, while the casual cursive script letters of a word are a combination of joins and pen lifts

Note: By not lifting your pen at the end of each letter, you can complete the word  in one complex stroke 

Note: This writing style can be further divided as “looped”, italic or “connected”.

 

Tools/equipment

Below is a list of tools etc that you will need. Although I have included a pencil, a dip pen holder and a pointed pen nib, you are not limited to those, you can use a regular ball point pen, or just the pencil, the choice is yours and with the amount of different writing instruments available the choices can be endless

Pencil

Eraser

Black Ink (preferably waterproof ink)

Practice sheet

Pen holder 

Pointed tip pen nib 

 

Practice strokes

First: You will require a practice sheet, if you have a practice workbook you can use that,  print out some copies of the free practice sheets found on the internet, or you can make your own at this site  http://ductus.josselincuette.com. or if you prefer, just use the link provided in the above list.

 

 Second: Practice the basic upward stroke several times to loosen up. Start slightly above the bottom line, then curve downwards till you touch the base line, then move your pen upwards till you touch the top line as shown.

 

 

Third: Practice the basic curve stroke several times to loosen up. Starting about one-quarter below the dashed line, curve up to your left till you reach the dashed line, now continue curving down to your left till you reach the base line, at this point start curving up to your right, till you reach above the base line

 

Lowercase Alphabet

Looking at the Cursive Script, you can see that it looks similar to the  script you were taught in elementary school, and as can be seen in the exampelar the arrows are showing the direction of the pen movement (strokes).

Note: Most of the letters being made use just one stroke, since cursive writing is about efficiency. 

Note: The second stroke on the letters ‘i,j’ are the dots above the letter, while on the letter ‘t’ it is the cross stoke

Note: The second strokes are completed after you have finished writing a particular word.

We will to start with the lowercase alphabet, breaking it into upward and curved stroke letters. 

Before stating print out a copy of the alphabet so that you have it handy as a reference

Image from Oh so beautiful paper

 

Longhand upward stroke minuscule letters

 

As you can see the letters b, f, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, and z all begin with the upward stroke. with some of the  strokes taking up the entire height of the line, others only reaching to the dashed line. while others like the ‘f’ ‘j’ ‘y’ ‘z’ reaching below the base line. 

 

 First: Starting with easiest letter ‘u’. Start by placing your pen tip on the baseline, now make an upward stroke till you reach the dashed line, continue with a downward stroke (tracing over the up-stroke you just did) that drops back to the baseline, then as you near the base line, curve back up again to the dashed line, then move downward (tracing over the up-stroke you just did) to the base line and end with a small horizontal curl to the right as shown. 

 

Second: Repeat making the letter ‘u’ until you feel comfortable with it. 

Note: Once you have the letter ‘u’ mastered, it is easy to see how other similar letters are made, as in the letters  i, j, m, n, r, v, w, and y. 

 

Third:  The letter ‘h’ while harder to form, starts at the same point as the letter ‘u’, but the upward stroke passes through the dashed line and continues till it reaches just below the top line. Now arcing your pen slightly up to the left making a curve that touches the top line, continue the curve until it is just below the top line then continue with a downward stroke, again passing through the dashed line till you reach the base line. Now you make an upward stroke that curves when you reach the dashed line line, then make a downward stroke till you reach the baseline, ending with a small horizontal curl to the right as shown.

 

 Fourth: Repeat making the letter (h) as many times as required, till you feel that you have mastered it. 

Note: Once you have the (h) mastered, it’s easy to see how other similar letters are made. such as in the letters  b, f, k, and l . 

Now take your time and practice forming the rest of the upward stroke lowercase letters, using the above guides as a  reference.

 

Longhand curved stroke minuscule letters

If you again look at the whole alphabet you will see that the letters a, c, d, e, g, o, and q all begin with a curved stroke,
with some of the strokes like the ‘d’ taking up the entire height of the line, while others only reach to the dashed line. with others like the ‘g’ and ‘q’ reaching below the bottom line. 

 when you start writing out the letters yourself, you may again find it helpful if you first draw them out using a pencil, then you can simply copy over the pencil lines with your pen.

 

First: Let’s start with the ‘o’ since it’s easiest. Start by placing your pen tip just below the dashed line. Now curve up to your left till you touch the dashed line, then continue curving down and around to your left till you reach the baseline, now start curving upwards to your right till you reach your starting point, then end with a small horizontal curl to the right as shown.

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Second: Repeat making the letter ‘o’ three times so that you get the feel of it. Once you have the ‘o’ mastered, it is easy to see how the other downward curved letters are made.

 

 

Third: Time to try a harder letter ‘g. Using the same procedure that you used for making the letter ‘o’  but instead of ending in the small horizontal curve, go up past the starting point and stop at the dashed line, then making a downward stroke, pass through the base line and as you get close to the next set of template lines start curving to your left and make an upward, diagonal stroke, that should cross the downward stroke of your (g) on the baseline line.

 

 

Fourth: Repeat making the letter (g) as many times as required till you feel that you have mastered it.

 

 

Fifth: Now taking your time, practice forming the rest of the upward stroke lowercase letters, using the above guides as a  reference.

Now that you’ve written each letter multiple times, it’s time to put it all together and write out the lowercase alphabet.

If you are having difficulties I have included below some links and a complete video

Links

https://design.tutsplus.com/articles/mastering-calligraphy-how-to-write-in-cursive-script

http://www.montessorisoul.com/handwriting-cursive-script

https://ohsobeautifulpaper.com/2015/09/getting-started-in-calligraphy

 

Video